Friday, October 20, 2017

Lesson 290 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. The camper sighed heavily, strained under the weight of his load, and carried it into camp.

2. Waiting for the signal to enter, the children played happily around the entrance to the park.

3. When she had performed her daily tasks, the old lady lit a fire and warmed herself for the evening.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. compound verbs

Sighing heavily, the camper strained under the weight of his load and carried it into the camp. = participial phrase

While he strained under the weight of his load, the camper sighed heavily and carried it into camp. = adverb clause

The camper who strained under the weight of his load sighed heavily and carried it into camp. = adjective clause

2. participial phrase

The children waited for the signal to enter as they played happily around the entrance to the park. = adverb clause

The children waited for the signal to enter and played happily around the entrance to the park. = compound verbs

The children who played happily around the entrance to the park waited for the signal to enter. = adjective clause

3. adverb clause

Performing her daily tasks, the old lady lit a fire and warmed herself for the evening. = participial phrase

The old lady that had performed her daily tasks lit a fire and warmed herself for the evening. = adjective clause

The old lady performed her daily tasks, and she lit a fire and warmed herself for the evening. = compound sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-290-parts-of-sentence-sentence.html

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Clickbait, Insomnia, and Writing Fears … Nevermore

You can tell we’re heading into Halloween — around the blog, our thoughts have been turning to topics dark and creepy. On Monday, Stefanie Flaxman brought up a thorny question — is it okay to use all of those fiendishly effective headline techniques, or do we run the risk of turning our content into “clickbait?”
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http://www.copyblogger.com/copyblogger-weekly-55/

Lesson 289 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. Standing nervously in the wings of the theater, Jeanne practiced her lines quietly and waited to go on stage.

2. The detective searched carefully through the old desk as he recounted in his mind the importance of the will.

3. The small black dog which looked weak and harmless leaped suddenly at the stranger.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. participial phrase

Jeanne stood nervously in the wings of the theater and practiced her lines quietly while she waited to go on stage. = adverb clause

Jeanne stood nervously in the wings of the theater, practiced her lines quietly, and waited to go on stage. = compound verbs

Jeanne who practiced her lines quietly stood nervously in the wings of the theater and waited to go on stage. = adjective clause

2. adverb clause

The detective searched carefully through the old desk, and he recounted in his mind the importance of the will. = compound sentence

Recounting in his mind the importance of the will, the detective searched carefully through the old desk. = participial phrase

The detective who searched carefully through the old desk recounted in his mind the importance of the will. = adjective clause

3. adjective clause

Looking weak and harmless, the small black dog leaped suddenly at the stranger. = participial phrase

Although he looked weak and harmless, the small black dog leaped suddenly at the stranger. = adverb clause

The small black dog looked weak and harmless but leaped suddenly at the stranger. = compound verbs

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-289-parts-of-sentence-sentence.html

Wednesday, October 18, 2017

What’s Your Worst Writing Fear? Dread and Trepidation from Our Editorial Team

It seems straightforward enough. We human beings are innately verbal creatures. Writing is just taking the language we dream, think, and speak in, and arranging the words on some paper or a computer screen. So why is it so hard sometimes? I think it’s because the same inventive brains that gave us Harry Potter, A
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The post What’s Your Worst Writing Fear? Dread and Trepidation from Our Editorial Team appeared first on Copyblogger.


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http://www.copyblogger.com/writing-fears-roundtable/

Lesson 288 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. The engineer knew the train was on time, leaned against the side, and sighed with relief.

2. Hoping to have the seating in place by evening, the committee for the Olympics hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road.

3. Mark took a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake before he returned to the cabin for breakfast.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. compound verbs

Knowing the train was on time, the engineer leaned against the side and sighed with relief. = participial phrase

The engineer that knew the train was on time leaned against the side and sighed with relief. = adjective clause

When the engineer leaned against the side and sighed with relief, he knew the train was on time. = adverb clause

2. participial phrase

The committee for the Olympics hoped to have the seating in place by evening and hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = compound verb

The committee for the Olympics that hoped to have the seating in place by evening hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = adjective clause

Because they hoped to have the seating in place by evening, the committee for the Olympics hurriedly set up bleachers along the main road. = adverb clause

3. adverb clause

Having taken a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake, Mark returned to the cabin for breakfast. = participial phrase

Mark who had taken a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake returned to the cabin for breakfast. = adjective clause

Mark took a quick, refreshing swim in the mountain lake and returned to the cabin for breakfast. = compound verbs

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in an eBook and a Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-288-parts-of-sentence-sentence.html

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

The Best Place to Consistently Find Winning Content Ideas

For the fourth night in a row, I woke up at 4:00 a.m. to the sound of a bird outside my window squawking in a unique, almost understated, way that echoed through my apartment as a clicking noise. On this particular night, I was accompanied by a pounding headache — but neither Squawking-Clicking Bird nor
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The post The Best Place to Consistently Find Winning Content Ideas appeared first on Copyblogger.


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Lesson 287 - Parts of the Sentence - Sentence Variety

Having learned about phrases and clauses, let's now use the following phrases and clauses to give variety to our writing: participial phrases, adverb clauses, adjective clauses, compound sentences or verbs.

First identify which of the above ways is used in the sentence, and then rewrite it using the three other ways identifying each of the methods used.

Example: Having finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = participial phrase

You must rewrite it using an adverb clause, adjective clause, and either a compound sentence or a simple sentence with compound verbs.

I finished my lessons, sat back, and gloried in my effort. = compound verbs

After I had finished my lessons, I sat back and gloried in my effort. = adverb clause

I who had finished my lessons sat back and gloried in my effort. = adjective clause

Instructions: Identify the written sentence and rewrite it the other three ways.

1. At dusk the manager threw the electrical switch, and the amusement park lit up like a star-studded galaxy.

2. As he walked out on the wire and completed his various routines, the acrobat carefully demonstrated his intricate ability.

3. The people who saw the basketball star surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings.


--For answers scroll down.











Answers:

1. compound sentence

Throwing the electrical switch at dusk, the manager lit up the amusement park like a star-studded galaxy. = participial phrase

At dusk the manager who threw the electrical switch lit up the amusement park like a star-studded galaxy. = adjective clause

After the manager threw the electrical switch, the amusement park lit up like a star-studded galaxy at dusk. = adverb clause

2. participial phrase

When he had demonstrated his intricate ability, the acrobat carefully walked out on the wire and completed his various routines. = adverb clause

The acrobat demonstrated his intricate ability, carefully walked out on the wire, and completed his various routines. = compound verbs

The acrobat who carefully walked out on the wire and completed his various routines demonstrated his intricate ability. = adjective clause

3. adjective clause

Seeing the basketball star, the people surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = participial phrase

When the people saw the basketball star, they surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = adverb clause

The people saw the basketball star, and they surged against the restraints and called out compliments and greetings. = compound sentence

For your convenience, all of our lessons are available on our website in our lesson archive at http://www.dailygrammar.com/archive.html. Our lessons are also available to purchase in eBook and Workbook format.
from Daily Grammar Lessons Blog
http://dailygrammarlessons.blogspot.com/2017/10/lesson-287-parts-of-sentence-sentence.html